CONTACT 

Please contact me so we can discuss your needs. I can explain the process and answer any questions. 

After we talk, I will send you a proposal, ask for a retainer, and will bill upon completion of the report. I will revise the report once based upon comments from the local jurisdictions, if any, at no additional charge.

I'll always be available to help if needed.

 THE SECRETARY OF INTERIOR'S STANDARDS 

When a proposed project has the potential to affect a historic resource, The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation & Illustrated Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings are used to provide design guidance to reduce or eliminate potential impacts to the historic structure. Designs that meet the Standards are generally considered to not cause on “adverse impact,” on a historic resource under CEQA. There are four Standards for the treatment of historic properties: Preserving, Rehabilitation, Restoring, and Reconstructing.

 

Most commercial projects seek to reorganize and reprogram interior spaces and make additions to historic buildings so the Rehabilitation Standard is used.  

 

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural or architectural heritage.

                                   

  1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces, and spatial relationships.

  2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces, and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

  3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

  4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

  5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

  6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture, and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

  7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

  8. Archeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

  9. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features, and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work shall be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

  10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in a such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

RICHARD BRANDI

Historic Preservation Consulting